Catholics studying the Bible

It was a simple e-mail. The writer said that she was committed to reading and studying the Bible. For her first time through, she wanted to accomplish it in a two-year period. She had already researched the Internet for Bible study plans and discovered there are tons of plans, lots of perspectives, and advice a plenty. So much so, it was hard to sort through it all. And such was the genesis of the e-mail asking for advice on “the plan.”

There are two books I would recommend you acquire: (a) the “Catholic Study Bible” edited by Fr. Donald Senior and Fr. John Collins, two preeminent Catholic scripture scholars, and (b) “Every Catholic’s Guide to the Sacred Scriptures” published by Thomas Nelson Publishers. The Catholic Study Bible is often available in our parish Book & Gift Store – and always available on Amazon. The other book is out of print but available on Amazon and other sites that offer used books.

I recommend the “Catholic Study Bible” because it has great footnotes and the Sacred Scriptures are preceded by a 480- page “study guide” for each book of Scripture that offer an introduction to each book, sets the context in history, and outlines the key points. It is a great way to get the big picture for any particular book before reading the book.

“Every Catholic’s Guide…” is an even better “study guide.” The study-guide section is preceded by several chapters that offer Catholic insight into biblical topics. Two great chapters are “The Bible and History” and “How the Bible Came About.” The other five chapters before the main part of the book are pretty good also.

Why I suggest these two books is so that the first-time (or n th-time) reader can have a sense of where each book fits into whole of history and salvation history. In all my years of leading Bible studies, when folks have a grasp of the context, the stories offer deeper meaning for personal reflection.

Where to begin? As I said last week, the main thing is to ensure that the main thing remains the main thing. When it comes to Christian Bible study, the main thing is Jesus. And so I always recommend starting with the four gospels. Mark, Matthew and Luke are similar – in fact they are called “synoptic” because they “see with the same eye.” The Gospel of John is very different in the way it tells the story of Jesus.

Begin with prayer. Always ask the Holy Spirit to guide your reading. Then open the Gospel of Mark. It is the shortest. Use one of the study guides to get the big picture and then read the gospel. Set aside time to read, reflect, and pray. Always begin and end with prayer. When you’re ready, read Matthew and Luke along with one of the study guides. And then read John. As you read, write notes to yourself in the margins of your bible, highlight passages – make it a working book, well worn, and well considered.

Along the way, be curious. Read the footnotes. If they reference Isaiah, a prophet of the Old Testament period, then open the Bible to those passages and read a little before and after to see what’s going on and imagine why the passage is being referenced. Take a quick look at the study guide for Isaiah. This way, you are slowly dipping your toes in the waters of the Hebrew Scriptures.

Want a little more detail about the text of Mark’s gospel. An easy source to look up specific passages is from www.crossmarks.com/brian/. This is produced by Rev. Brian Stoffregen, a Lutheran pastor, whose work is solidly Christian. It adds a little more depth to the study guides and footnotes. You might ask if I have such notes. I do, but they are not so easily available or organized. (Hmmm… maybe I should do that…??)

That should get you started – and it is highly focused on reading the story of Jesus in the gospels. It is a plan to ensure the main thing remains the main thing.

 

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3 thoughts on “Catholics studying the Bible

  1. Thank you! Great advice. I am so grateful for this blog. I miss being at Sacred Heart every week, but this helps me still feel all the love that fills the place.

    You are a true blessing!!

  2. Perfect! I was just thinking that I needed a new study bible and have ordered both of these that you recommended. Thank you, FrG. p.s. Hey hi, Chrysteile!

  3. Thank you for the recommendations. I’ve recently begun revisiting a few books in the Old Testament after reading the Art of Biblical Narrative (a fantastic book). I’ve been trying to find a good Catholic Study Bible but with no luck. Your post came in time 🙂

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